The Latest from Classical 90.5

'Cello Bae' Sheku Kanneh-Mason Wins Worldwide Fans After Royal Wedding

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TeDB27cq3fE The British-born, 19-year-old prodigy Sheku Kanneh-Mason was a standout at the wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle this weekend. Kanneh-Mason performed three pieces during the ceremony, as the Duke and Duchess of Sussex signed the register (out of view of guests and cameras) just after their exchanging of vows. Kanneh-Mason performed Maria Theresia von Paradis' Sicilienne, Gabriel Fauré's Après un rêve and Franz Schubert's "Ave Maria." But,...

Read More

Classical News from NPR

When the 10 members of Tower of Power were in place behind Bob Boilen's desk, strategically positioned around the band's famous five-piece horn section, their first collective blast three beats into the sound check literally made the video crew jump. It was more a force of nature than a sound, and an impressive display of the "five fingers operating as one hand" concept of band cohesiveness.

Jess Stacy On Piano Jazz

Aug 10, 2018

This week's Piano Jazz presents an episode from the early years of the program with guest Jess Stacy (1904 – 1995), who came out of retirement to appear on the show in 1982. As one of the leading pianists of the swing era, Stacy was best known for his work with the Benny Goodman Orchestra and had a prolific career before stepping back from the music world in the 1950s. In this classic session from the archives, Stacy needs no introduction as he starts the show with a solo performance of "Dancing Fool." McPartland joins to end the hour with "St. Louis Blues."

How to Listen

Contact Us

Reach us at Classical 90.5

Call (573) 882-9682.

Jean Sibelius, born 150 years ago on Dec. 8, 1865, was the first Finnish composer to reach an international audience, but his popularity began at home. In the late 1890s, Finland was a part of the Russian empire and its people were striving for independence.

Wayne Horvitz is one of those musicians who does almost everything — from leading a small group of improvisers to conducting a big band, and from composing for symphony orchestra to running a nightclub. The Seattle-based keyboard player turned 60 this year, and he's celebrating by adding even more to his schedule: playing birthday concerts on both coasts.

Ingrid Jensen On Piano Jazz

Dec 4, 2015

Trumpeter Ingrid Jensen has built a strong reputation among critics and peers — including Marian McPartland, who praised the warmth and virtuosity of her playing. Jensen's performances as a leader and featured soloist have taken her around the world, and she can be heard with the Christine Jensen Orchestra, her own quartet and quintet formations, and a number of New York bands.

If we're relying on the younger generation to help boost interest in classical music, look no further than Teddy Abrams.

In 1964, near the end of his career, Billy Strayhorn accompanied himself on a live recording of one of his best-known songs. It starts:

I used to visit all the very gay places

Those come-what-may places

Billy Strayhorn In Five Songs

Nov 29, 2015

Why do Beethoven's symphonies remain so appealing? It's a question we put to Simon Rattle a few years ago after he had finished conducting the Vienna Philharmonic in all nine of them.

"There's nothing harder," Rattle said, "and at the end of it all, nothing more rewarding. This is one of the great monuments of Western art." Those performances were recorded for a set released in 2003.

On a long drive, Itzhak Perlman will sometimes listen to classical music on the radio and try to guess who's playing.

"There is always a question mark," he says. "If it's good, boy, I hope it's me. If it's bad, I hope it's not me."

Patricia Barber On Piano Jazz

Nov 20, 2015

Patricia Barber is a pianist and singer who's solidly grounded in the jazz idiom while eclectic in her style. She's recorded a series of albums that have each established a wider audience for her music, and in 2002, she released the successful Verse.

Pages